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People in the News

April 25 - People in the News

Hunter New, a first-year student in the master of health services administration (MHSA) program at Armstrong Atlantic State University, is a 2011 recipient of the Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Award sponsored by the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA).

The scholarship provides financial support to graduate students in health administration. Scholarship funds are awarded each year to all AUPHA full graduate programs, including the MHSA program at Armstrong. The faculty members within these programs select students to receive the scholarships based on each student showing a significant promise as an emerging leader in the field of health services administration.

More than 900 scholarships have been awarded since the program was established in 1975. Foster G. McGaw, founder of the American Hospital Supply Corporation, endowed the scholarship. McGaw recognized the importance of health administration education and AUPHA's contribution to the field.

"Hunter New is relatively new to the field health services administration, but he has already shown significant promise for future growth, and has also begun to become more active in his professional and career development as a future healthcare leader," said Joey Crosby, Armstrong MHSA program coordinator. "We, as members of the faculty, feel that he has tremendous potential to continue to develop and that this scholarship award and recognition will assist in that regard."

New, whose hometown is Quitman, Ga., is proud of the scholarship.

"It is an honor to be recognized by your own faculty," he said. "The scholarship will also alleviate some of the financial pressures of graduate school. I'm very happy with the program at Armstrong because it is very challenging and has allowed me an entry into health administration."

Also, Charlotte Johnson, a medical technology student at Armstrong Atlantic State University, has received a Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Scholarship for her outstanding academic achievement.

The American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) partners with Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics annually to award scholarships to clinical laboratory students. The purpose of these scholarships is to help defray education costs, promote medical laboratory science as a rewarding career and help address the workforce shortage of qualified professionals. Scholarship awards of $1,000 are available from Siemens for 50 students in their final clinical year of a National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences-accredited program in medical laboratory scientist, medical technologist, or clinical laboratory scientist.

The American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) chose Johnson for her academic achievement, strong leadership and active participation in community service. A 1992 Armstrong graduate with a chemistry degree, Johnson chose to return to Armstrong to pursue her growing interest in medical technology. She is scheduled to graduate in 2012.

"Having worked in the chemistry field for several years, I wanted to move into the area of medical technology," said Johnson. "This scholarship will help to defray some of the tuition costs."

Hazan Aziz, Armstrong director of medical technology, added, "Charlotte is a deserving student with impressive academic achievements who chose to return to Armstrong to continue her education and expand her career opportunities. She has a promising future in the medical technology field."

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Bryan Robinson, a project manager with J.T. Turner Construction, was recently elected to the board of directors for Urban Hope Savannah. Urban Hope is a ministry devoted to children and its vision is to help bring change to the inner city through its children.

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The Lowcountry Economic Network and Alliance along with a representative from the S.C. Department of Commerce on Friday recognized Ed Jerue, owner of owcountry Chair, as the Beaufort County Economic Ambassador for 2011.

The Lowcountry Chair Company has recently expanded its range of casual furniture products and also introduced a new high-end product line utilizing natural reclaimed wood, with the majority of the wood used coming from local, reclaimed sources. The entire manufacture and assembly of the chairs and other furniture takes place on St. Helena Island, employing local craftsmen and women, who together produce 500 to 800 pieces of furniture a month, with sales contracts with Home Depot and Target among others.

"Mr. Jerue's hard work here in the Lowcountry is the perfect example of what can be accomplished in our region," said Kim Statler, executive director of the Lowcountry Economic Network. "Mr. Jerue is producing an excellent product, aiding our local economy, employing area residents and giving back to the community."

Jerue also owns and operates The Lowcountry Store, which was named one of Home Accents Today's “50 Retail Stars for 2009” with the magazine recognizing the store for its positive presence in the local community and successful merchandising, marketing and advertising. The Lowcountry Store takes pride in selling products and food items that are locally produced and grown.

After presenting Jerue with his ambassador's plaque, Ford Graham, director of special projects for the Department of Commerce, thanked Jerue for all that he does to support Beaufort County and South Carolina.

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Two civil engineering graduate students at Georgia Tech Savannah are among an elite group to be awarded fellowships under the 2011 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP). The program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who have demonstrated outstanding abilities and accomplishments, as well as the potential to strengthen the vitality of science and engineering in the United States.

Brittany Bruder and Stephanie Smallegan will utilize the fellowships to further their education and conduct vital coastal engineering research. Bruder and Smallegan are the first Georgia Tech Savannah students to be awarded these highly competitive fellowships. Both will receive an annual stipend of $30,000 that is renewable for three years, plus $10,500 each year for educational allowances. Applicants for the fellowship program submit a proposal to the NSF, which are reviewed by a panel of scientists, mathematicians, engineers and other experts in graduate education. Proposals must demonstrate how the student's research will enhance scientific and technical understanding, while benefiting society.

Bruder, a Ph.D. candidate in civil engineering at Georgia Tech Savannah who obtained her undergraduate degree from Columbia University, plans to study the applicability of tidal streams as a renewable energy source in Coastal Georgia while concurrently researching new tidal turbine technologies. Bruder plans to assess the tidal hydropower potential around Rose Dhu Island with the hopes of a potential turbine prototype installation. Rose Dhu, situated 10 miles from Savannah, is the future site of an educational center for the Girl Scouts of America.

Bruder's past accomplishments include completing an internship at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility studying tides in the Chesapeake Bay, working on stadium projects for the 2012 Olympic Games while interning in a London engineering firm, cataloging civil infrastructure legislation while interning for U.S. Senator Jim DeMint, and being selected as a member of the national engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi.

Smallegan, who was recently inducted into the national engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi, earned her undergraduate degree from Georgia Tech Savannah and has continued her Ph.D. level studies at the campus. Smallegan's research will utilize video observations of nearshore processes at Cape Hatteras, N.C. to address the continual shaping of coastlines and the need for a prediction methodology of future shorelines in order to provide sustainable coastal management. She will look at the causes of longshore currents, model the effect of Diamond Shoals on surf-zone waves and examine the relative importance of cross-shore transport and wave-driven transport. It will be the first coastal erosion study of this nature to be conducted at Cape Hatteras. Smallegan's past research accomplishments include performing beach surveys and quantifying the volume of sand lost since nourishment as part of Tybee's Beach Morphology Monitoring project. She also participated in a coastal erosion study conducted at Myrtle Beach, S.C. that assessed the accuracy of longshore currents estimated from video observations to in situ current profiler measurements. This research was presented at the fall 2010 AGU Conference in San Francisco and the Ocean Sciences 2010 Conference in Portland, Ore.

"NSF Fellowships are among the most esteemed awards a graduate student can receive for their scientific and engineering research," says Director of Georgia Tech Savannah Dr. David Frost. "We are immensely proud of both of these students who are truly committed to finding unique and inventive ways to solve real-world engineering issues. Their research studies will have a significant impact on civil engineering challenges for coastal regions."

Bryan Riemann, associate professor of sports medicine in the Department of Health Sciences at Armstrong Atlantic State University (AASU), has met the requirements to be honored as a Fellow of the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA). He will be inducted into the fourth class of Fellows at the NATA annual meeting in New Orleans in June 2011.

The NATA Fellows program was created in 2008 to honor the association's most accomplished scholars and researchers for their leadership and service to the athletic training profession. Only those selected for this distinction are allowed to use the prestigious designation of "FNATA."

Since 1997, Riemann has authored or co-authored 28 refereed national or international journal research papers, including nine since joining Armstrong in fall 2006. In addition, he has authored or co-authored 107 refereed regional, national or international research presentations, 40 of them at Armstrong. All his Armstrong research has included the participation of graduate or undergraduate students.

Since 1996, he has presented 33 clinical workshops or symposia, including several at international meetings.

"I would not have been able to achieve this honor and be so scholarly productive without the support of my colleagues and the hard work of many of our graduate students," said Riemann. "Having the Biodynamics and Human Performance Center on the Armstrong campus also has been instrumental in advancing my research and involving students in scientific study early in their careers."

Directed by Riemann, the lab was established in 2008 as the result of collaboration between the departments of health sciences and physical therapy. Students in the master's of sports medicine and doctor of physical therapy program use the lab to collect data and conduct original research for their capstone projects required for graduation. Of the 45 student research projects that have been conducted in the Biodynamics and Human Performance Center, 35 have appeared in academic publications as either full papers or abstracts.

"What we have tried to do with the lab is to provide a multidisciplinary center where undergraduate and graduate students, particularly those in our graduate sports medicine and physical therapy programs, can find research opportunities that are unique and that allow them to get their name in peer-reviewed academic publications," he said.

Riemann holds a Ph.D. in sports medicine from the University of Pittsburgh, a master's in sports medicine from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and a bachelor's in athletic training from West Chester University.

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